Guest Post: Gemma

Image credit: englishwithatwist.com

Image credit: englishwithatwist.com

 

I recently posted on my Facebook adhesions group for people who were willing to tell their story(s) about adhesions. This is the first response I received. I am so excited to be able to bring you other “voices” of adhesions or ARD (Adhesion Related Disorder).  So, without further adieu, this is Gemma’s story.

This is my story.

At the age if 16 I was forced to had a termination following which I suffered a really bad infection. Exactly 12 months later I was rushed into hospital with unexplained abdominal pain. I had this on and off for a few years. At the age of 20 I was referred to a gynaecologist who did a laparoscopy where he found my fallopian tube was attached to my bowel.  I also had polycystic ovaries which were drilled. I had trouble conceiving but after some treatment finally conceived after 3 years. After the birth of my daughter I suffered extremely painful and heavy periods but no other pain.  I underwent a laparoscopy to burn the nerve endings to my womb away. Following this i conceived with my son. After the birth of my son my periods were even heavier so they agreed to burn the lining if my womb away but this was unsuccessful and the following year I underwent a partial hysterectomy at the age if 28. After this I continued to experience pain and the following year they operated to remove my cervix, they did this by keyhole and found I had extensive adhesions but they would not touch them as by keyhole it would be too dangerous.  I was put on morphine for pain and sent home.  The following year I went back for laparotomy and lysis of adhesions. At this time they found my bowels, bladder and ovaries were all stuck together and attached to my abdomen wall. All this was cleared up and put back properly. I was pain free following this for 8 months,  however they returned and for the next 4 years the pain continued to increase and was soon back on a morphine substitute.  Earlier this year I was referred back to my gynaecologist who sent me for an MRI scan which showed my ovaries were attached to my bowel and my bowel was twisted.  He agreed to operate but referred me to a bowel surgeon so they could operate jointly.  I had surgery 8 weeks ago, they opened me from my belly button downwards, removed my ovaries, fallopian tubes and cleared up the adhesions.  Pain has greatly reduced following surgery,  until this week the pulling had gone, however this has returned along with the constant abdominal / back pain and I know the adhesions had returned. I also know that I cannot have any more surgery unless an emergency and have to live with adhesions for the rest of my life.

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8 thoughts on “Guest Post: Gemma

  1. This is unfortunate, sad and painful. I sympathize with you who are suffering from ARD. It is sad that medical science has not yet found the effective way to cure this. At this point the only sensible option is: “prevention is better than cure”. While we may have been getting enough information by reading your blog, we have yet to read about what cause/s ARD. Is this due to an undiscovered virus? If this is virus, is it air borne or water borne? Is this diet-related or due to some ways of life? Or, is this hereditary? I think we would need to know the cause as much as we need to know the cure. Thank you, Joy, for sharing this information about ARD.

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  2. I’m so sorry that you have been through all of this so young Gemma! Living with something like this your whole life can seem overwhelming. I’m slowly learning techniques such as meditation and specific exercises and stretches that help me cope with my pain levels enough to do things for short periods of time. I hope you can find something that works for you soon.

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  3. Nattokinase is an enzyme that breaks down fibrin, the basic fabric of scar tissue. It doesn’t require a prescription and has been a huge help to me in breaking down adhesions and old scar tissue and generally making my life bearable.

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